The Stand Down

The intense 10-hour days are wearing me down. I’m constantly exhausted: by the time I slog through the afternoon traffic (about 60 to 90 minutes to cover 21 miles), I have only a couple hours to myself before collapsing into bed. Time is the scarce commodity right now and I am greedy for more me time!

Today, we were sent home from the job site at 1:30pm. Since we start our days at 6:00am, it was only an eight hour day. Whooo-hoooo! An afternoon all to myself! I could barely contain my glee. Yet there was a dismal group vibe in the air. Over 300 of us were being walked off the site due to an accumulation of incidents. We were in “stand down” mode: a punishment from the general contractor who was basically saying to us, “No more work (or money) for you!” Politics and intensified stress have wormed into the scene: schedules and completion dates are tight. The drive to get it done is coming directly into conflict with safe practices. Read the rest of this entry »

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The Dance

Whenever I start working with somebody new – which is often because of both this line of work and being an apprentice – I notice the same pattern of sussing out “who – excactly – ARE you?” happening through conversation and non-verbal cues.

Some of the directly verbal questions that almost always come out are:

– What did you do before you decided to become an electrician?
– How old are you?
– Are you married? / How many kids do you have?
– Where did you grow up? / Where are you from?
– Where do you live?
– So…what made you decide to be an electrician?
– What does your partner/husband/significant other do?

Can you imagine asking some of these questions in such a point-blank manner to a fellow office worker? Read the rest of this entry »


Night and Day

After undergoing yet another whiz quiz, 18 hours of company and site-specific training and donning at least five types of security badges, I started work with a new crew. It’s a completely different world. My new site is one of the largest in the region: so large that the trades workers have created their own temporary city. Our parking lot is larger (and dustier) than a CostCo parking lot. The capacity of our lunch and break area is just under 2,000 people. My first morning was surreal because I had to find my foreman amongst a bustle of identically colored hard hats and orange vests. It was like a social easter egg hunt. People were pretty helpful when I explained it was my very first morning on site, and now – a couple weeks into this new gig – I trade small talk with the now-familiar faces who helped me that first morning Read the rest of this entry »